DIY: Super Greens Powder

22 Comments

Several years ago I had purchased some powdered greens. They were VERY expensive.  But, I figured, if greens are the most energy dense foods on earth, I could add them to a variety of foods my family was already eating, and we’d be healthier!  I didn’t exactly realize at the time, I could do the exact same thing, for almost pennies all by myself!

DIY: Super Greens Powder. For parents who want concentrated nutrients, without high priced supplements!

Unlike Natalie, I am no gardener. I plant stuff and then hope for a harvest.  I let the timer watering my grass also water our veggies, and hope it’s enough.  Sometimes we get lucky, sometimes we don’t.  We got lucky with our kale this year!  So, we decided instead of picking and freezing it (which is what I normally do with kale), we decided to pick and dry.

Drying

The simple steps to making your own, very inexpensive, super green powder:

1) Harvest or buy greens (we used kale)

DIY: Super Greens Powder. For parents who want concentrated nutrients, without high priced supplements!

We ended up with a lot of kale!

DIY: Super Greens Powder. For parents who want concentrated nutrients, without high priced supplements!

2) Wash, dry, and pull the leaves off of the stalky-woody stems.  You just want the leaves!  Arrange leaves on a cookie sheet.

DIY: Super Greens Powder. For parents who want concentrated nutrients, without high priced supplements!

Place in the oven at the lowest temperature (mine was 170 degrees Fahrenheit), for about 3 hours, or until your greens can be crushed into powder when you pick it up.

DIY: Super Greens Powder. For parents who want concentrated nutrients, without high priced supplements!

3) Crumble and Save

Once the kale is dried, simply crush it with your hands or a rolling pin, and save it in an airtight container!

We used kale because of the explosion of it in our garden, but you can do this with any greens!  You can even make a variety, and mix them all within the same jar.    To make it a finer powder, simply place in a blender or food processor for a moment and crush it up entirely.  (last picture is after a food processor).   The finer the powder, the better it is for smoothies if you don’t own a good blender!

DIY: Super Greens Powder. For parents who want concentrated nutrients, without high priced supplements!

DIY: Super Greens Powder. For parents who want concentrated nutrients, without high priced supplements!

What you can use it for:

  • Add your greens to a smoothie!
  • Add a scoop to marinara sauce
  • Mix it in with scrambled eggs for “Green Eggs”.

Amazon link for a jar with an air tight seal

DIY: Super Greens Powder. For parents who want concentrated nutrients, without high priced supplements!
DIY: Super Greens Powder. For parents who want concentrated nutrients, without high priced supplements!

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22 Comments

You can Store this in mason jars or other air tight containers for several months. Christimas gifts is an awesome idea Jo! I would love to get a basket full of healthy jars of food!
@justin- yes to Dandelion greens!
@Dani I don’t know

Geetika, the longer it takes and the minimal amount of heat you can use actually preserves more nutrients than quick cooking things. So, I’d definitely opt for the low and slow approach to preserve the most nutrients.

One of the greatest benefits is that the nutritional content of dehydrated veggies is left relatively unchanged, so you can use them to help meet your daily vegetable intake of 2 to 3 cups of vegetables per day, as set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
HEAT AND NUTRIENTS
The dehydration process exposes the vegetables to some heat. Although the temperatures are kept fairly low, some heat-sensitive vitamins, primarily vitamin C, are lost. Vitamin A is fairly well-preserved despite the heat exposure, so long as the temperature is kept controlled. Conventional cooking processes, however, will also cause a loss or destruction in these two vitamins. Water-soluble vitamins, such as B vitamins, may be lost during the rehydration process of dried vegetables, but they can be preserved if you use the soaking liquid during cooking.

DIETARY FIBER CONTENT
Dehydration preserves the full dietary fiber content of the vegetables, ensuring they remain a high-fiber food choice. Dietary fiber provides bulk to your diet and can help reduce the effects of constipation. Vegetables are naturally high in fiber, both soluble and insoluble; the former helps create soft bulk, while the latter helps speed up the passage of waste through your bowels.

Great idea… hadn’t thought about sneaking it into smoothies!
Random observation: is that a spider on the table in the picture of the kale??!

lol good eye Jennifer!!

I went back to see what picture you meant.. (found it..the very first one with the kale in the basket)..

it sure looks like one when you increase the size of the picture … and it is huge even before making the picture bigger lol

I’m glad you determined it was plastic. I’m over here having a mini panic attack at the thought of being you & realizing that thing was loose in my house!